Current State of Japanese Prisma☆Illya

It has been quite awhile since my last post, but it’s Hanbe once again.  A lot of the hype since the release of fate/kaleid liner Prisma☆Illya 2wei Herz (fate/kaleid liner プリズマ☆イリヤ ツヴァイ ヘルツ) back in May 2016 has now subsided.  Let us revisit this neo-standard series and see if Prisma☆Illya players got all the tools they need to be consistent and be competitive.  Recall, in my inital post that the series had a strong level 0, a lackluster level 1, a non-existent level 2, and a very potent level 3.  With the addition of 2wei Herz cards, Kaleidoscope lost its spot in the spotlight and various quality of life improvements were made at all levels, .  Despite all this, the series remains shy of “top tier” status but remains a threat in the tournament scene due to its strong finish. Continue reading Current State of Japanese Prisma☆Illya

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The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Breakdown, click here to check it out.  It provides the context for the full series and lets you know how to read these articles.  If you’ve read it already, then continue on!

This article is rated Experience Levels 3-6.  This article series is intended to cover a wide range of topics about particular sets, and will help players of all kinds when it comes to knowing their set or the set of an opponent.

Welcome to the Breakdown.  thenightsshadow here, and as we do each time on the Breakdown, we look at several questions about a series, then get on down to breaking down what makes the series tick and how one should approach playing it.

The set we’re going to cover in this article is The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, and the theme for this article is going to be “The Importance of Good Support”, so even for those that don’t play The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya they can still get something out of this article.

As a reminder, here are the general questions we ask ourselves for each set.

1) Competitively, why should I play this set over other sets?
2) What is the ideal set up from Level 0 to Level 3?
3) How does our play look like versus an opponent?
4) Where are our good and bad matchups?

Once we answer these questions,  there will be questions about those questions, but we’ll cover those afterwards.

Continue reading The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya

The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Breakdown, click here to check it out.  It provides the context for the full series and lets you know how to read these articles.  If you’ve read it already, then continue on!

This article is rated Experience Levels 3-6.  This article series is intended to cover a wide range of topics about particular sets, and will help players of all kinds when it comes to knowing their set or the set of an opponent.

Welcome to the Breakdown.  thenightsshadow here, and as we do each time on the Breakdown, we look at several questions about a series, then get on down to breaking down what makes the series tick and how one should approach playing it.

The set we’re going to cover in this article is Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls, and the theme for this article is going to be “How to Properly Evaluate Level 3s”, so even for those that don’t play Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls they can still get something out of this article.

As a reminder, here are the general questions we ask ourselves for each set.

1) Competitively, why should I play this set over other sets?
2) What is the ideal set up from Level 0 to Level 3?
3) How does our play look like versus an opponent?
4) Where are our good and bad matchups?

Once we answer these questions,  there will be questions about those questions, but we’ll cover those afterwards.

Continue reading The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – Idolm@ster Cinderella Girls

Buddy Help – Storming into Dungeon World

Wow, it really has been two months since my last post. Hello everyone, it’s ReiZayaki and I’m back to writing on here. Honestly, I’ve been in a huge slump since Conts and haven’t been able to figure out what to write or do with Buddyfight lately. That was until I was out at dinner the other day with a friend who also plays Buddyfight. They also said something that motivated me: “It doesn’t matter what you play, it’s how you play it.” The reason why that sticks so hard right now is because I’ve been so caught up with preparing for Spring Regionals and just not knowing what to play to be the most competitive, but for this, I should really just enjoy it and play/build what I want. So, without further ado, welcome to a deck archetype that my friends know me for: Dungeon Storm (Alternatively known as “Hanako is a Trap”).

Dungeon Storm is a deck revolving around either of the 6th Omni Storm Lords in Dungeon World. It’s something that I’ve revisited after a few cards came out to help with some issues I had with previous iterations. The main monsters that are the build-around are the two Omni Lords: Catastrophe and Variable. These are the main three cards from Dungeon World:

Shining Up!! Hanako: This is the main reason I came up with Dungeon Storm way back when this wasn’t out in English yet. It’s the only Size 0 Adventurer and therefore the only way (outside of items) to give Storm Lord Double Attack. I’ll explain how next.

Dancing Magician, Tetsuya: Welcome to his “Yo Yo Yo” greatness. When Tetsuya links with another Adventurer, you give any card in the link attack Double Attack. So, link with Storm who is in the center, along with Tetsuya and Hanako, and voila, Double Attacking Cord.

Remote Trickster, Lone Remote: The main spell in this deck type is Dangerous Fuse. Since it’s a Trap, getting some extra value off Lone Remote is a very good way to get ahead in Life and hand size. Also, having a lot of good synergies with removal makes it that much sweeter. It’s easily the safest buddy in the deck if you don’t wanna give much away, that or you’re just not man enough to buddy Cord.

This is an example build that uses both Cords very effectively. Changing cards can make the deck more catered to one or the other Cord.

Size 2s:

Size 1s:

Size 0s:

So that totals out to 24 Monsters. You could cut back on Pitts or some other stuff, or even add more Adventurers that are very situational but this is essentialy the cut and paste version. The Hanakos are there to have an Adventurer to link attack with Tetsuya and Cord to gain Double Attack on the Cord. Iyan acts as copies 5-8 of Lone Remote and also keeps your hand size looking large for Variable Cord. Tetsuya is a combo piece, explained earlier with Hanako but can also just give Lone Remote, Iyan, or Pitt Double Attack when necessary. Dark Miserea is a very defensive unit that can save you with that life gain as well as move. You could also give it Double Attack with Tetsuya and Hanako’s combo. Lone Remote is there to keep hand size when you use traps as well as poke in for some damage that will add up quickly.

Now for the all stars, Variable and Catastrophe Cord. Depending on which one comes out, you need to play slightly differently. When Variable comes out, you’re expending a lot of hand size for a very strong wall that has a Critical of 3 as well as Penetrate. Most of the time, you want to throw extra Adventurers or extra copies of Spells in your hand. If you’re gutsy you could throw all but I highly recommend against it, cause’, you know, you’re not going to have a hand. Catastrophe, however, is a lot more of an offensive threat with Utility. In exchange for losing Penetrate and sapping cards from your hand to fuel its soul, Catastrophe gains its soul from the top of the deck and also has Move. In this situation, Hanako is less useful as you would like Catastrophe and Tetsuya together with an Item (of which there are 4 of). Catastrophe’s ability allows you to pay 2 gauge to fuel his Soul with any card from your deck. This allows you filter out any unnecessary Spells, situational Adventurers, or just non-Trap Attribute cards (which is relevant later in this article). Both Cords have Soulguard so their life expectancy is quite large even though you only have 2 Cords total. They can make a very large impact against most decks.

Spells:

Another set of 24 cards. This brings us to 48. Dangerous Fuse, Dragon Blessing, and Defeat Monsters are all cards meant to plus your hand. Defeat Monsters and Dangerous Fuse are both cards that will plus us in some way as the former works very well with Tetsuya, while the latter works with Catastrophe Cord when you send them to gauge. Shalsana and Crossbow are our shields, as Shalsana works even with a center and Crossbow is a Trap for Lone Remote. Emblem can search either of the Cords or even Miserea if need be. The rest ability is also very useful. Dangerous Bed is some nice removal that also triggers Lone Remote. And finally, the most important card, Buddy Help. Draw 2 for 3 Gauge. This and Dangerous Fuse are the reasons I first made Dungeon Storm, and it’s surprisingly effective. Simple, but effective.

Items:

This last card totals us up to 52. This can surprisingly work with both Cords., even if you hold center with Variable. When it eventually dies, Trap Maker can make the downside of failing to mill a Trap nonexistent if you have no hand. Though, you don’t really want that to happen, cause’, once again, you’d have no hand. However, this card immediately shines with Catastrophe. With Catastrophe, Trap Maker becomes more consistent as the INV Lord himself will take out any non-Trap cards from your deck over time. It’s also (technically) Hanakos number 5-8 when you need to keep your center open to link with Tetsuya, Trap Maker, and a non-Adventurer Size 2.

And there you have it everyone. I’m finally back and will hopefully be doing this a lot more often. I have a bunch of ideas on the backburner and heck, maybe one of them will be an amazing idea that does better than just being a “theory that is fun”. But honestly, Hanako is a Trap Dungeon Storm has been something that my group of friends have joked about a lot but had very real applications. The deck opened up my mind to the ideas of more viable decks with similar strategies. If you really want to, give it a chance and tell me what you think. Until next time, thanks for reading.

-ReiZayaki

-Victory Force is Next-

The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – Fate/kaleid liner Prisma Illya

If you haven’t read the Introduction to the Breakdown, click here to check it out.  It provides the context for the full series and lets you know how to read these articles.  If you’ve read it already, then continue on!

This article is rated Experience Levels 3-6.  This article series is intended to cover a wide range of topics about particular sets, and will help players of all kinds when it comes to knowing their set or the set of an opponent.

Welcome to the Breakdown.  thenightsshadow here, and as we do each time on the Breakdown, we look at several questions about a series, then get on down to breaking down what makes the series tick and how one should approach playing it.

The set we’re going to cover in this article is Fate/kaleid liner Prisma Illya, and the theme for this article is going to be “How to Build around a Combo”, so even for those that don’t play Fate/kaleid liner Prisma Illya they can still get something out of this article.

Special thanks to Make Marika Great for providing the numbers I will utilize in this article.

As a reminder, here are the general questions we ask ourselves for each set.

1) Competitively, why should I play this set over other sets?
2) What is the ideal set up from Level 0 to Level 3?
3) How does our play look like versus an opponent?
4) Where are our good and bad matchups?

Once we answer these questions,  there will be questions about those questions, but we’ll cover those afterwards.

Continue reading The Breakdown – EN Weiss Schwarz – Fate/kaleid liner Prisma Illya