Shark Tips – Installment 6 (Immaturity Knows No Sin)

This article is rated Experience Level 7.  This article is perfect for budding tournament players that wish to understand more about doing well in tournaments and increasing their win rate.

Welcome to Shark Tips, an irregular installment that aims to help readers improve their play, no matter what card game they play.  In this segment, I discuss a tip I’ve learned or am in the process of learning, and expand on its ramifications and/or applications.

Continue reading Shark Tips – Installment 6 (Immaturity Knows No Sin)

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Yuuhi Guest Post #1 – Tournament Mindset of Practice

Hi, I’m Yuuhi and I’m a (hopefully more-frequent-soon) guest writer here at Climax Phase. I am relatively new to Weiss Schwarz, only having played a  few months, but hopefully my experience in competitively participating in other games such as Yugioh and Magic the Gathering will provide some insights for you readers out there.

I’ll be writing a series of articles regarding the mindset of a tournament player here. Over the next few articles, I hope to paint a picture of how a player can be an effective tournament player, keeping good habits while (hopefully) minimizing the effect of bad ones.

The first aspect we will be touching on is the idea of practice. Of course, anyone who enjoys playing Weiss Schwarz is going to get in a bunch of games, because you simply like playing the game. However, while playing the game is practice in and of itself, it is not necessarily about the quantity of games that you play, but rather their quality. Many people describe Weiss Schwarz as a game where you simply “turn your cards sideways”, but I would like to challenge that notion. The game itself can boil down into a state where there simply are no other options, but the game had to progress to such a state. There is almost always something that could have been different about that game to lead to a different outcome. This is not to say that the alternate line of play would have been correct, but it is more a statement of theory that multiple lines of play exist; and that perhaps a different choice may have been correct.

The immediate effect of talking about this hypothetical game is that practice immediately makes a striking point.

“The idea that practice actually accomplishes something.”

Again, Weiss Schwarz is a game that takes a fair amount of skill to play; and there is established theory and fundamentals to playing the game. A player that has played the game a lot and is skilled at the game’s fundamentals is generally going to do better than someone who has randomly picked up a deck, even if that deck is presumably better. (Notwithstanding tier 0 formats like in YGO/BDFight). This is one of the most important boons of practice.

Being strong at a game’s fundamentals is proven to take you far, especially in a tournament setting with a large amount of players. Generally, in the first few rounds you will play against someone who does not have the strongest fundamentals, and having stronger fundamentals (knowing how to compress, when to cx combo for maximum effect, etc) will swing the game in your favour. Luck still plays a large part in any card game, but Weiss Schwarz is quite unique in that over the course of a game (which is fairly long compared to other games), you will be able to significantly influence that luck through fundamental card game skills.

Another point to make about practice is that you will generally learn the most from playing against players who are better than you. There is no other way besides just putting yourself out there and experiencing ‘why’ they are better. Everybody has differing opinions and experiences, but between having fundamental skills and developing your senses and experiences by playing absorbing knowledge from better players, you will definitely improve as a player.

As this is my first article here, I would like to keep it fairly short, but do know that this is a huge topic and I could honestly write a whole book on the subject.

Please let me know what you thought of this article, and I would greatly appreciate any tips for writing / theory that you, dear reader, can give.

Yuuhi – signing off.

 

Shark Tips – Installment 5 (The Stage in His Hands)

This article is rated Experience Level 7.  This article is perfect for budding tournament players that wish to understand more about doing well in tournaments and increasing their win rate.

Welcome to Shark Tips, an irregular installment that aims to help readers improve their play, no matter what card game they play.  In this segment, I discuss a tip I’ve learned or am in the process of learning, and expand on its ramifications and/or applications.

Continue reading Shark Tips – Installment 5 (The Stage in His Hands)